Callie Thornton
                                                        PART 1



                                                       
                                                         PART 2





Vaccine-Induced Disease Epidemic Outbreaks: The Engineering of ‘Pandemics’By A. True Ott, PhD, ND go here to read (very interesting)

From CDC Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Safety: Overview Key Facts¹
I have highlighted some things in blue that I think warrents our attention before taking or allowing our children to take cartain vaccines, however I may Have miss somethings...the main thing is: if you don't know exactly what it is and what is in it and what can happen (I'm not talking about JUST the paperwork they give you to read) find out please!) Sincerely Blog Administrator


CDC Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Safety: Overview Key Facts¹
 FIND THE FULL CDC ARTICLE HERE 


•Seasonal influenza vaccination is the most important way of preventing seasonal influenza virus infections and potentially severe complications, including death. Seasonal influenza vaccination reduces the likelihood of becoming ill with influenza or transmitting influenza to others.•Seasonal influenza vaccines do not contain the 2009 H1N1 strain and are not expected to provide significant cross–protection against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza.² Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines to prevent the 2009 H1N1 virus have been licensed; initial doses of licensed vaccine are expected to be available by mid–October 2009.•Two types of seasonal influenza vaccine are licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States: trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) and live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV).•TIV is injected into the muscle of the upper arm or thigh. It can be used for people 6 months of age or older, including those with chronic medical conditions, pregnant women, and healthy people who are not pregnant. Healthy people are defined as people who do not have an underlying medical condition that predisposes them to influenza complications. Several TIV products are licensed for use in the United States (see Table 2 of 2009 ACIP Seasonal Influenza Recommendations).¹•LAIV is given as a nasal spray. It can be used for healthy people 2-49 years of age who are not pregnant.•Both seasonal LAIV and TIV contain three strains of influenza viruses that are antigenically equivalent to the annually recommended strains: one influenza A (H3N2) virus, one influenza A (H1N1) virus, and one influenza B virus. The H1N1 strain in the 2009-10 seasonal influenza vaccines is different from the strain that causes pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza.•Each year, before influenza season starts, one or more virus strains in the vaccine might be changed on the basis of global surveillance for influenza viruses and the emergence and spread of new strains.•Influenza vaccines, like any medical product, carry some risks but serious adverse events after influenza vaccination are uncommon. Adverse events after vaccination may be causally related to vaccine or may be coincidental. When seasonal influenza vaccines are administered according to the licensed indication and usage information they are safe. * Am I reading that as long as they are administrated correctly that they are safe?????•All seasonal influenza vaccines licensed in the United States are produced in eggs and they do not contain adjuvants. Some multidose TIV preparations contain thimerosal which is used as a preservative to prevent bacterial growth.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and FDA routinely monitor the safety of all vaccines licensed in the United States, including seasonal influenza vaccines. This summary provides the following information on seasonal influenza vaccines:Safety of TIV and LAIV, including adverse events, contraindications and precautions, screening, and safe vaccine administration•The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)•Additional resources for clinicians about influenza vaccines and vaccine safetyThis document does not contain information about influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines. For information about 2009 H1N1 vaccination please visit the CDC 2009 H1N1 web page at http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/.Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (TIV)

Adverse Events
Studies support the safety of annual TIV vaccination in children and adults. TIV is administered as an injection and may cause reactions at the injection site, such as pain, redness, and swelling. Systemic events that may occur after TIV may or may not be caused by the vaccine. Some people experience symptoms after TIV that are also those seen in influenza infection, but TIV (which contains killed virus) cannot cause the influenza.

More information about TIV safety is provided below:
•The most frequent reactions reported after vaccination in children and adults are pain and other injection-site reactions. Up to 64% of people vaccinated with TIV experience pain at the injection site, which usually resolves in <2 days without treatment.³
•Fever, malaise, myalgia, and other systemic symptoms that can occur after vaccination with TIV most often affect persons who have had no previous exposure to the influenza virus antigens in the vaccine (e.g., young children). In adults the rate of having these events is similar after TIV and after a placebo vaccine.¹•Ocular or respiratory symptoms (e.g., red eyes, hoarse voice, cough) have occasionally been reported within 24 hours after TIV administration in some studies, but are typically mild and resolve quickly without specific treatment.¹•Vaccine components, such as egg proteins, can rarely cause true allergic reactions, also called immediate hypersensitivity reactions, among certain recipients. Symptoms of immediate hypersensitivity range from mild urticaria (hives) and angioedema (swelling beneath the skin) to anaphylaxis.1,6•In a study of more than 250,000 children aged <18 years, the investigators did not identify risk for any important adverse events after TIV. ‡4•Another study evaluated adverse events in adults across 15 years and showed that reporting rates for adverse events after TIV were reasonably consistent over time. This study did not identify any new safety concerns. §5•In 1976, a type of influenza (swine flu) vaccine was associated with Guillain–Barré Syndrome (GBS), a serious neurological condition that can cause paralysis.¹ The 1976 flu virus was different from the 2009 H1N1 virus. ◦Each year, about 3,000 to 6,000 people in the United States develop GBS whether or not they received a vaccination — that’s 1 to 2 people out of every 100,000 people.  (GBS is often developed from many different Clinical Trial Meds, even after approval from the FDC and is often mis-diagnosed)◦In 1976, there was a small risk of GBS following influenza (swine flu) vaccination approximately 1 additional case per 100,000 people who received the swine influenza vaccine. (The population was not warned of this until it was too late)That number of GBS cases was slightly higher than the background rate for GBS.◦Since then, numerous studies have been done to evaluate if other influenza vaccines were associated with GBS. In most studies, no association was found, but two studies suggested that approximately 1 additional person out of 1 million vaccinated people may be at risk for GBS associated with the seasonal influenza vaccine.◦For comparison, an estimated 750 per million adults are hospitalized with seasonal influenza each year; many of these cases could be prevented by vaccination. In addition, studies suggest that the risk of developing GBS after having influenza is higher than the potential risk of developing GBS after vaccination.¹ (So if you don't take the vaccine and get the flu, you might stand the chance of getting GBS, if you take the vaccine and don't get the flu, you might stand a chance of getting GBS??
)
Contraindications for TIV
TIV should not be administered to the following people:•People who have had a severe allergic reaction to the following, unless the person has been desensitized ◦Severe allergy to eggs◦Severe allergy to another component of the TIV vaccine. Package inserts should be consulted for components³, (this says PACKAGE INSERTS, NOT THE SHEETS YOUR ARE GIVEN TO READ!}◦Severe allergy to a prior dose of an seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV or LAIV)•TIV should not be administered to infants less than 6 months of age.

Precautions
In general, vaccinations should be deferred when a precaution is present. However, a vaccination might be indicated in the presence of a precaution because the benefit of protection from the vaccine outweighs the risk for an adverse reaction. This is left to the healthcare provider to make a decision. The following are precautions for TIV: 1,6•Guillain–Barré Syndrome (GBS) within 6 weeks of a previous dose of an influenza vaccine (TIV or LAIV)•Presence of a moderate or severe acute illness with or without a fever. Persons who were hospitalized with an acute illness but who are now well enough to be discharged from a hospital can be vaccinated.

Screening before vaccination
•Before administering an influenza vaccine, people should be asked about the following:1,6◦Allergies. Asking the persons if they can eat eggs without adverse effects is a good way to screen for egg allergy.◦Adverse events, including GBS, after prior doses of influenza vaccine◦Current health status including any current (acute) illness

Safe vaccine administration
To reduce the risk of adverse events after vaccination the follow steps should be taken:6•TIV should be administered by intramuscular injection using appropriate technique.•Providers vaccinating children and adolescents aged <19 years should be sure the TIV formulation is licensed for use in children in their patients’ age group and the proper dose is used. TIV is not licensed for use in infants aged <6 months.•Providers should consult the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) General Recommendations regarding other steps to take that may help prevent adverse events after TIV vaccination.6Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV)

Adverse Events
Studies support the safety of LAIV. LAIV is administered as an intranasal vaccine and replicates in the nose. Rhinitis (runny nose) and nasal congestion occur more commonly after LAIV than TIV or placebo in adults and children.7 More information is provided below:•In children aged 2 through 4 years, 51% of first dose LAIV recipients experienced runny nose within 10 days after vaccination, compared with 42% who received TIV. In adults aged 18 through 49 years, 44% had runny nose after LAIV, compared with 27% who received an intranasal placebo.7•In children aged 2 through 6 years, fever >100º F occurred more often after first dose LAIV (16%) than placebo (11%).8 Adults receiving LAIV did not have an increased risk for fever after vaccination compared with placebo.7•Some studies suggest young children who receive LAIV are at increased risk for wheezing or asthma during the 42 days after vaccination. ◦One study of 8352 children aged 6 through 59 months showed that the younger children aged 6 through 23 months had increased rates of wheezing in the 42 days after LAIV (6%) than TIV (4%) (LAIV is not licensed for this age group). Children aged 24 through 59 months had similar rates of wheezing after LAIV (2%) and TIV (3%).7,9•In adults the following other adverse events were reported more often after LAIV than after an intranasal placebo: headache, sore throat, tiredness/weakness, muscles aches, cough, chills, and sinusitis.7

Contraindications
 LAIV should not be administered to people who have had a severe allergic reaction to the following, unless the person has been desensitized¹

Severe allergy to eggs
◦Severe allergy to another component of the LAIV vaccine. The package insert should be consulted for components.9

◦Severe allergy to a prior dose of an influenza vaccine (TIV or LAIV)
LAIV should also not be administered to people who are in the following groups because the effectiveness or safety of LAIV is not known:
•Children aged <2 years or adults aged ≥50 years•Pregnant women•People with known or suspected immunodeficiency diseases or immunosuppressed states (including those caused by HIV)•Children or adolescents receiving aspirin or other salicylates (because of the association of Reye syndrome with wild-type influenza virus infection)•People who have other medical conditions that place them at increased risk for complications from influenza, including:
◦Asthma or reactive airways disease◦Other chronic disorders of the pulmonary or cardiovascular system (except hypertension)◦Neurological/ neuromuscular diseasesMetabolic disease, such as diabetes mellitus◦Renal or hepatic dysfunction◦Hemoglobinapathies

Precautions
The following are precautions for use of LAIV
•Guillain–Barré Syndrome (GBS) within 6 weeks of a previous dose of an influenza vaccine (TIV) or (LAIV)¹•Presence of a moderate or severe acute illness with or without a fever. 6 Persons who were hospitalized with an acute illness but who are now well enough to be discharged from a hospital can be vaccinated.

Screening before vaccination
•Before administering an influenza vaccine, people should be asked about the following:1,6
◦Allergies. Asking the persons if they can eat eggs without adverse effects is a good way to screen for egg allergy.◦Adverse events, including GBS, after prior doses of influenza vaccine◦Current health status•Young children may experience episodes of wheezing in association with certain respiratory viruses. Some young children might have a history of wheezing but have not had asthma diagnosed. The following screening recommendations should be used to assist persons who administer influenza vaccines in providing the appropriate vaccine for children aged 2 through 4 years.1 ◦Screen for possible reactive airways diseases when considering use of LAIV for children aged 2 through 4 years, and avoid use of this vaccine in children with asthma or a recent wheezing episode.◦Consult the medical record, when available, to identify children aged 2 through 4 years with asthma or recurrent wheezing that might indicate asthma.◦Ask parents or caregivers of children aged 2 through 4 years: “In the past 12 months, has a healthcare provider ever told you that your child had wheezing or asthma?”◦Do not administer LAIV to children whose parents or caregivers answer “yes” to this question and children who have asthma or who had a wheezing episode noted in the medical record during the preceding 12 months should not receive LAIV. TIV is available for use in children with asthma or possible reactive airways disease.

Safe vaccine administration
•Severely immunosuppressed persons should not administer LAIV((?????). However, persons with other high-risk conditions for influenza complications can administer LAIV. In addition, healthcare providers or other close contacts of severely immunocompromised persons should receive TIV, rather than LAIV. The rationale for these recommendations is the theoretical risk that a live, attenuated vaccine virus could be transmitted to the severely immunosuppressed person.¹

(Please study this and ask questions)
•LAIV should be administered by an intranasal squirt using appropriate technique (see package insert).7•Providers should consult the ACIP General Recommendations regarding other steps to take that may help prevent adverse events after LAIV vaccination.6

Reporting Adverse Events
•The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) is a US vaccine safety surveillance system, co-managed by CDC and FDA.•VAERS is a voluntary post-marketing safety surveillance program, collecting information about reported adverse events (possible side effects) that occur after administration of vaccines licensed in the United States.•VAERS is a key mechanism to identify potential vaccine safety concerns. Generally VAERS cannot determine if an adverse event was caused by vaccine but can help determine if further investigations are needed.•Healthcare providers are encouraged to report all clinically significant adverse events after influenza vaccines and other vaccines to VAERS, even if the healthcare provider is not certain that the vaccine caused the event. Anyone may submit a report to VAERS.•VAERS reports may be filed securely online (http://vaers.hhs.gov/), by mail, or by fax. Report forms are available online or can be obtained by calling 1-800-822-7967 to request reporting forms or other assistance.•Clinicians and other reporters of adverse events should be encouraged, when submitting a report to VAERS, to include as much information as possible (e.g., vaccination location, date, vaccine type, lot number and dose).•VAERS data without identifiers may be accessed through the CDC Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research (WONDER) public database within about 1 week after CDC receives the VAERS report or for download at (http://vaers.hhs.gov/scripts/data.cfm) within about 6 weeks after CDC receives the VAERS report.•Additional information about VAERS is available at http://vaers.hhs.gov/.

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program
The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a federal program operated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). VICP exists to help pay for the care of certain persons found to have had a serious reaction to a vaccine covered by the VICP. For more information about VICP, call 1-800-338-2382 or visit their web site at www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation.
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